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Published on 12 Nov 2010 | over 6 years ago

Some of my videos of Mars, Saturn and Jupiter through my telescope, and the images that I process from them.

If you want to see one of the world's best planetary imagers in action, look for Damian Peach on YouTube (www.youtube.com/user/planetimager/videos or elsewhere on the web! His images are legendary!

FAQ's:
Q. Why is Jupiter upside down?
A. Two reasons - 1) I am in the southern hemisphere, and this is the view that we have here, and 2) I didn't flip the image when I made the video (which would have made it 'technically' correct!)

Q. Why can't I see any stars around the planets in the video?
A. They are there, but the exposure settings on the camera are not set high enough to show them. If I exposed the images to see the stars, the planets would be great big white blobs!

Q. What is the music?
A. Rhian Sheehan, Standing in Silence album, Part 8 (NOT Part 7 as I put in the video credits!)

Q. What equipment did you use?
A. Orion XT10i (10" refelector) telescope, NEQ6 Pro motorized mount, Imaging Source DMK41AF02 astronomy camera, Astronomik Type II LRGB filterset, 2x barlow lens, laptop for mount control and image capture.

Q. How much did the equipment cost?
A. Total cost about $5500 (NZD). There is considerable extra cost involved in getting this equipment imported from the US to New Zealand, and of course we have to buy through dealers who have to make a profit too. If you are buying within the US, you can expect to pay a LOT less.

Q. What is the magnification?
A. To calculate this is focal length of telescope divided by diagonal chip size of camera... 1200mm / 8mm = 150x magnification. But I also used a 2x barlow, so 150 x 2 = 300x magnification.

Q. What processing and capture techniques did you use to create these images?
A. Most of the techniques were learned from two websites:-
www.iceinspace.com.au/projects.html and
www.astro.shoregalaxy.com/webcam_astro.htm

There have been several questions and confusion about our own galaxy, the Milky Way, which can be seen in one of my images. For those who are interested, have a look at this video - www.youtube.com/watch

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