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Published on 16 Nov 2013 | over 3 years ago

She may flirt with males and even other females. She may actively try to escape and find other dogs. If she is a dominant dog she may mount other dogs, people or even other animals. A stud dog will be very interested but the experienced one will not mount her unless she invites him and stands for him.. A female interested in a male literally sticks her butt in his face. At this stage, while she will wrestle and play with the male, allow him to put his head and feet on her and her tail will move to one side [called flagging,] when he smells her or trys to mount her, she generally will not allow him to penetrate her. Some females will allow males to mount and penetrate them in this stage though, and some males will force a smaller, less dominant female in this stage. Males will be extremely excited around a female in this stage.
Male puppies as young as five weeks old may show sexual mounting even with pelvic thrusting. This can be considered a normal part of play behaviour and is necessary for development of sexual response in adults (Hart, 1980b). A problem may arise if older puppies, stimulated by play, mount and clasp inappropriate objects, including children and other animals. If this is not prevented it may become a behavioural problem (Fox and Bekoff, 1975).
Individual males show great variation in intensity and degree of 'courtship' behaviour. The male is continually checking scent posts for evidence of an oestrous female and if he finds one he remains in the area or tries to follow her trail. When he finds a receptive female he investigates her head and body and then her anogenital region. The female responds by elevating her rump and lifting her tail to one side then standing while the male mounts. A common behavior among domesticated dogs is chasing their own tails. Researchers are not completely certain why dogs chase their own tail, however some research studies found a link between tail-chasing and high cholesterol. A study found that when dogs experience an increase in activity of hormones tied to the "fight or flight" response, it causes dogs to chase their tails more often.

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